Windows does not have enough information to verify this certificate

Windows does not have enough information to verify this certificate

Microsoft Windows is unable to verify the authenticity of the digital certificate used to sign this file. For example, if you are trying to install an application or update from an unknown source and it fails with this error message, it means that the source is not trustworthy.
This article will help you troubleshoot common issues with certificates in Windows so that you can continue to use Microsoft software securely.

Digital Certificates

A digital certificate is an electronic document used to provide authentication, non-repudiation, and evidence of authority. A certificate is used to create a trust relationship between two parties. It is used in software to send or receive information securely, such as when you are performing online banking, shopping, or sending private emails.
Certificates are most often used to verify the identity of a user or computer to a server or authenticate an IP address for network access. They can also be used to encrypt data as it travels over the Internet.

How to troubleshoot the root cause of certificate errors

The most common reasons for Windows to fail to verify the authenticity of a digital certificate are –

The Root Certificate is not installed.
If the root certificate is not installed, the application will fail to authenticate due to the inability to check the authenticity of the certificate.

The Root Certificate is expired or has an invalid date.
If the root certificate is expired or has an invalid date, the application will not be able to authenticate the certificate and will fail with this error.

The Root Certificate is invalid.
If the root certificate is invalid, the application will not be able to authenticate the certificate and will fail with this error.

The Root Certificate is corrupted.
If the root certificate is corrupted, the application will not be able to authenticate the certificate and will fail with this error.

The Root Certificate Trust is broken.
There are two scenarios that can result in a broken certificate trust – The Root Certificate is broken.
The Root Certificate Store is broken.

Reset the Certificate Store

Important: If you are experiencing issues with the root certificates, you can try resetting the certificate store.
If the issue is with a third-party certificate, resetting the certificate store will not resolve it.
You should try resetting the certificate store if you have added an additional certificate to the certificate store, or if you have replaced the existing certificate with a new one.
If you have replaced the existing certificate with a new one and you are still experiencing issues, you should try removing the new certificate and adding the old one back.

To reset the certificate store – Press the Windows key and R to open the Run dialog box. Type “”mmc”” and press Enter. Click File > Add/Remove Snap-in. Click Certificates and select Computer Account. Click Add. Click Close. Expand Certificates (Local Computer). Expand Personal > Certificates. Right-click the certificate that is causing the problem and select Delete. Select Delete again to confirm.

Reimport Root Certificates

If you have replaced the existing certificate with a new one and you are still experiencing issues, you can try removing the new certificate and reimporting the old one. You will need to import the root certificates from a Windows installation disc.
To reimport the root certificates – Press the Windows key and R to open the Run dialog box. Type “”mmc”” and press Enter. Click File > Add/Remove Snap-in. Click Certificates and select Computer Account. Click Add. Click Add Root Certificate. Click Install Root Certificate. Click Place Import. Locate the installation disc, select the \i386 folder, and click OK. Click Next. Select the root certificate you want to import, and click Next. Click Finish.

Install the Root Certificates from a Windows CD

If you have tried resetting or reimporting the certificates and you are still experiencing issues, you can try installing the root certificates from a Windows installation CD.
To install the root certificates – Press the Windows key and R to open the Run dialog box. Type “”mmc”” and press Enter. Click File > Add/Remove Snap-in. Click Certificates and select Computer Account. Click Add. Click Add Root Certificate. Click Place Import. Locate the Windows installation disc and select the \i386 folder. Click Next. Select the root certificate you want to import and click Next. Click Finish.

Reset and Reinstall the Certificate Repository

If you have tried installing the root certificates from a Windows installation CD and you are still experiencing issues, you can try resetting and reimporting the certificate repository.
To reset and reimport the certificate repository – Press the Windows key and R to open the Run dialog box. Type “”mmc”” and press Enter. Click File > Add/Remove Snap-in. Click Certificates and select Computer Account. Click Add. Click Add Root Certificate. Click Install Root Certificate. Click Place Import. Locate the Windows installation disc and select the \i386 folder. Click Next. Select the root certificate you want to import, and click Next. Click Finish. Click File > Import > Custom Certificate Authority. Click Next. Select Place New Certificate. Click Next. Select the root certificate repository and click Next. Click Finish.

Check for Known Viruses or Software That May Cause Problems with SSL

If you have tried resetting, reimporting, or resetting and reimporting the certificate repository and you are still experiencing issues, you can try checking for known viruses or software that may cause problems with SSL.
To check for known viruses or software that may cause problems with SSL – Press the Windows key and R to open the Run dialog box. Type “”mmc”” and press Enter. Click File > Add/Remove Snap-in. Click Certificates and select Computer Account. Click Add. Click Add Root Certificate. Click Install Root Certificate. Click Place Import. Locate the Windows installation disc and select the \i386 folder. Click Next. Select the root certificate you want to import, and click Next. Click Finish.

Conclusion

Certificate errors are one of the most common issues that you may encounter while using Windows or Microsoft software. These errors may be caused by a broken root certificate, a corrupted root certificate, or a broken certificate trust.

The most common reasons for Windows to fail to verify the authenticity of a digital certificate are – The Root Certificate is not installed, The Root Certificate is expired or has an invalid date, The Root Certificate is invalid, The Root Certificate is corrupted, The Root Certificate Trust is broken.

You can try resetting the certificate store, reimporting the root certificates, installing the root certificates from a Windows CD, resetting and reimporting the certificate repository, or checking for known viruses or software that may cause problems with SSL.

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Anthony Clarck

Anthony Clarck

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