Military payment certificate series 481

Military payment certificate series 481

Military payment certificates (or MPRs) were a form of currency issued by the United States Department of Defense to active duty military members. They were also known as “bucks” or “funny money.”
This article details the history of military pay certificates, their role in everyday life for service members and their value today as collectors items.

The History of Military Payment Certificates

Military payment certificates are a type of currency issued by the United States Department of Defense to active duty military members. They were first issued in WWII as a replacement for real money, which was in short supply. They have been printed and re-issued periodically ever since. MPRs are not considered legal tender, with the exception of those printed after 1968. They are not to be confused with military scrip, which is a type of scrip issued by the Department of Defense on a limited basis to pay soldiers in certain situations.

Like real money, MPRs can be used to buy goods and services. They are issued to soldiers in place of a salary, and can be exchanged for goods at military facilities and overseas exchanges. They are considered an “in-kind” payment, as they cannot be converted to cash. MPRs are not considered a salary; they are taxable.

Why Do Military Members Get Payment Certificates?

MPRs are issued in the place of a real salary, which is often in short supply. There are many reasons for this. The U.S. military is a large organization, and it costs a lot of money to keep it supplied with everything it needs to fight wars. As a result, the Department of Defense is often strapped for cash.

This shortage of cash is especially acute when the military is preparing for or engaged in a war. The government’s budget is determined not only by what it has already spent, but also by what it expects to spend in the future. If the government knows that it will need to spend a lot more money, it can ask Congress to increase the budget. But during a war, no one knows how much the war will cost.

How to Use MPRs

If you receive MPRs, you can use them to buy goods and services at military exchanges and commissaries. If you are stationed overseas, you can use them to buy items at exchanges operated by the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) or at contracted commercial facilities.

MPRs cannot be used to buy goods and services from most commercial vendors. (However, you can use MPRs to pay for items at military commissaries and exchanges, if a vendor at the commissary accepts them. ) You cannot use MPRs to pay for basic necessities, like food, utilities and rent. You cannot convert them to cash.

Where Can You Spend MPRs?

You can spend your MPRs at any military installation around the world as well as off-base commercial facilities. The latter are likely to be found in a few very large cities where there are many service members stationed. Places where you can spend your MPRs include:

– Exchange stores (also known as BX stores, post exchanges or PX stores) on military installations

– Military Clothing Sales Stores (MCS)

– Commissaries (which are grocery stores operated by the government for military families)

– Military Bowling Centers

– Recreational facilities, such as golf courses

– Massage and acupuncture clinics

– Child Development Centers

– Vet Centers

– Funeral homes

– Libraries

– Shoe stores

– Movie theaters

– Bowling alleys

– And many more!

A Short History of MPRs and Their Value Today

During World War II, the U.S. government issued military payment certificates (MPCs) as a form of scrip. They replaced real money that was in short supply. MPCs were used as a form of military currency until 1958. At that time, the military decided to try issuing MPCs again. This time, the MPCs were printed on paper with a type of ink that could be detected with ultraviolet light. The MPCs were supposed to prevent counterfeiting and other fraudulent activities. However, MPCs have been used in place of real money by the military in various ways at different times. In the 1960s, they were used to pay soldiers working in Vietnam. This was done to prevent people from finding out how many soldiers were in Vietnam. It was also done in order to prevent people from spending real money. In the 1990s, MPCs were used again in the Persian Gulf War because of a shortage of real money. In the 2000s, U.S. military personnel were again using MPCs because of the effects of the fighting in Afghanistan. Some veterans have turned their MPCs into collector’s items. The value of some MPCs has increased as a result of the demand by collectors. A number of them are now worth more than $1.

Collecting Military Payment Certificates: Things to Look Out For
When buying MPCs, you should be careful to examine them carefully. There are many available, but some are counterfeits. Counterfeit MPCs have been produced and sold to people who collect them.

Look for these things when examining a MPC to see if it is genuine:

– Examine the paper to make sure it is the right weight for the type of paper used. It should be about as thick as a dollar bill.

– Check the watermark. It should appear as a continuous pattern on both sides of the paper.

– Make sure there are no holes or tears in the paper.

– Look at the printing. Does it look faded or crude? If so, it may be a counterfeit.

– Look at the ultraviolet light-sensitive security markings on the paper. They should appear as a continuous pattern in both black and blue on the paper.

– Check the signatures on the paper. Are they real? Are the signatures of people who were supposed to sign the paper?

– Make sure the MPC has the correct date printed on it.

– Verify the serial numbers on the MPCs. Are they sequential? Do they have the correct number of digits?

– Be careful with MPCs that are packaged in plastic. Some counterfeiters have been known to package their counterfeits this way because it makes the MPCs look like new.

Conclusion

Military payment certificates are a type of currency issued by the United States Department of Defense to active duty military members. They have been issued periodically ever since WWII as a replacement for real money, which is often in short supply. MPRs are not considered legal tender, but they are used as an alternative to cash on military bases. They can be exchanged for goods at military facilities, such as exchanges. They are not to be confused with military scrip, which is a type of scrip issued by the Department of Defense on a limited basis to pay soldiers in certain situations.

There are many reasons why military members are issued MPCs. They are used as a form of military currency, and they are also issued in place of a real salary. MPCs have been printed and re-issued periodically ever since WWII, and today, some of them are collector’s items.

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Anthony Clarck

Anthony Clarck

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