1935 a silver certificate hawaii

1935 a silver certificate hawaii

When you think about it, it’s a bit strange. After all, the island state of Hawaii is pretty far away from the continental United States. In fact, Hawaii is around 2,600 miles away from the rest of the country. You may have noticed that there aren’t any other U.S. territories or states on this list; that’s because they were all deemed too remote to be given their own unique currency at the time. Something you might not know about Hawaii and its place in U.S history is that it was actually one of the last places to get its own version of paper money when so many others had already received theirs. This article will discuss everything you need to know about why hawaii got silver certificate

What is a Silver Certificate?

Silver certificate bills were used as currency in the United States between 1878 and 1964. They were printed between 1878 and 1928 and again (after a brief hiatus) between 1934 and 1964. These bills were printed on special paper that was a bit different than the paper used for other bills. We call bills printed before 1934 “red seal certificates” because of the red seal that was applied to the paper. Likewise, we call bills printed between 1934 and 1964 “blue seal certificates” because they were printed on special blue paper. These blue seal bills are the only U.S. paper money that has the motto “In God We Trust” on it. These bills were redeemable in “lawful money,” which means gold or silver. This was because the United States was on the gold standard during this time period. Since the gold standard has been abandoned, these bills are now only worth as collectibles. Most were withdrawn from circulation in the 1960s, as the Treasury Department stopped redeeming these bills. Many of these bills have been replaced with Federal Reserve Notes.

Why was Hawaii late to the party when it came to paper money?

Hawaii was late to the party when it came to getting its own unique series of paper money because it was so far away from the continental United States. At the time, it was thought that Hawaii would not be able to keep up with the demand for paper money from its own citizens, let alone the rest of the country. It was also felt that it might be too expensive to send the newly printed Hawaiian bills back to the mainland for circulation there. It was also feared that it might take too long for newly printed bills to reach the Hawaiian banks and that the bills might be out of date before they even arrived.

The Hawaiian Silver Certificate Series of 1928-1942

After much debate, Congress finally approved the issuance of Hawaiian Silver Certificates in 1928. Hawaiian bills are unique because they are the only U.S. bills that have Hawaiian language on them. The bills depict Hawaiian flowers, birds, and fish. Hawaiian Silver Certificates bear the seal of the Territory of Hawaii and the signature of the Hawaiian Territorial Governor. They are redeemable in “gold or silver coin.” Hawaiian Silver Certificates were issued in four series, each of which has a unique design. The First and Second Hawaiian Silver Certificate series were issued in 1928 and 1934, respectively. The 1935 Hawaiian Silver Certificate was issued in the Third Hawaiian Silver Certificate series. The Fourth Hawaiian Silver Certificate series was issued from 1936 to 1942. The First, Second, and Fourth Hawaiian Silver Certificate series were issued in both Regular and Presentation (large) sized bills. The 1935 Hawaiian Silver Certificate was issued only in Regular size.

How can you identify a Hawaiian Silver Certificate?

Hawaiian Silver Certificates were issued in three different series. Each of the three series has its own unique design. If you want to identify which series a Hawaiian Silver Certificate is from, you’ll need to take a close look at the design. The First Hawaiian Silver Certificate series has a portrait of King Kamehameha I on the front. The Second Hawaiian Silver Certificate series has a portrait of King Kamehameha III on the front. The Third Hawaiian Silver Certificate series has a portrait of King Kalakaua. Hawaiian Silver Certificates have a unique seal on the back. The seal is unique because it includes a Hawaiian language phrase. The seal reads, “The Hawaiian Islands.” The seal also includes the words “Territory of Hawaii.” Finally, the bill has a serial number printed along the top edge.

Other Reasons for Issuing Hawaiian Certificates in 1935

Hawaiian Silver Certificates were issued in 1935 for reasons other than the fact that Hawaii was so far away from the rest of the country. In fact, 1935 was the same year that Hawaii became a state. This Hawaiian Silver Certificate series was issued in large quantities. Because of this, 1935 Hawaiian Silver Certificates are easy to find in low-grade condition. They also command a lower price than other more scarce Silver Certificate series. During the Great Depression, federal lawmakers wanted to make it easier for people to save. They hoped that this would encourage people to save more and depend less on banks for loans. In order to encourage saving, they chose to issue bills with low denominations. This is why the 1935 Hawaiian Silver Certificate has a face value of only $1.

CONCLUSION

Hawaiian Silver Certificates are a fascinating series. They depict Hawaiian flowers, birds, and fish. They also include the Hawaiian language. Hawaiian Silver Certificates have relatively low values. They are thus easy to collect without spending a fortune. Hawaiian Silver Certificates make a great addition to any paper money collection.

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Anthony Clarck

Anthony Clarck

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